Flashback Blog: How I Grew to Love Boba Fett thanks to the Prequels

I’m tired, someone has torpedoed my night and I don’t feel like writing so much as turning on the XBox and virtually shooting things.

I’m also working on something that will tie thematically into this blog, so I’m moving it here now as a part of my massive reclamation effort from the original kessel korner. I’m not so much phoning it in then, as providing a prelude to the symphony.

It’s got everything that’s a hallmark of my style. Love for the prequels, hate for the fanboys and just a sprinkling of disdain for what those fanboys do to the collective playground.

I’ll be in a better mood tomorrow. Enjoy this for now.


How I Grew to Love Boba Fett thanks to the Prequels

Originally published Oct. 10, 2005 at the original kessel korner.

Boba Fett Publicity Still from 1980
I'm just sayin'.

I’m about to get inundated with hate mail, and possibly burned as a heretic, but here goes. Boba Fett was a minor character, whose entire mystique – “I’m so evil even Darth Vader respects me” – was destroyed by his legion of psychotic fans.

He received so much love that I grew to hate him. When The Empire Strikes Back was re-released in its “Special Edition” format in 1997, I had to tell the smelly morons next to me (who were also eating popcorn very loudly with their mouths open – and likely wondered why no dates were with them) to quiet down when he first appeared onscreen. Their reaction was so obnoxious that it spoiled what was otherwise an incredibly sinister and enjoyable moment.

There were a few books that came out with Boba Fett stories, that made him a mercenary with a skewed but understandable lapse in morality. They wanted us to sympathize with him, because though he worked for Jabba the Hutt as a gun-for-hire, he wasn’t all that bad, was he?

That made me hate him even more, because the idea removed any of his bad guy credibility. And once I had read it, it was impossible to un-read it. The Boba Fett Love Club had gotten out of control.

For God’s sake, he took two shots at Luke from behind and MISSED. How much of a demi-god could he be?

I admitted, even in my frenzy of Fett hatred, that Boba Fett’s armor is truly cool, and he was a great minor character. The jangle of spurs that Ben Burtt added to his walk just made him seem like the biggest bad ol’ gunslinger since Sam Peckinpah made The Wild Bunch.

But thanks to his overly-adoring fans, I could barely stand to watch him. And when the Return of the Jedi Special Edition came out – I was in a group of people who cheered when he died (Bad Guy Dead=Good). I’m not kidding when I say that a group of his worshippers then threw things and hurled insults – even threats. Did we know that we’d get that reaction?

Yep. We knew we likely would.

So I went through a long period heartily disliking Boba Fett, and that negative view of his character grew and fed on itself – it went wild. I baited Fett fans into arguments just so I could see their reaction when I told them their idol was a minor character who was barely integral to the story who had bad aim.

And then Episode II happened. And the one man, the only being in the universe, who could rehab my love for Fett – did. (Goerge Lucas, in case you couldn’t guess.)

Jango Fett was such an explosion of attitude, swagger and general skill that I had to respect him. He wasn’t onscreen for long, but Temeura Morrison (and Lucas’ writing) made Jango Fett so cool that I loved every moment he was there. He didn’t beat just a smuggler and a Wookiee (albeit the two coolest ever known), he beat Obi-Wan Freakin’ Kenobi. Too bad about the Mace thing.

Since Boba was therefore established as a clone of Jango, my love for Jango transferred to Boba. He’s not just fake swagger and “Expanded Universe” talk-up. He’s the direct descendant of the baddest cat to face off against a Jedi without a lightsaber, or the Force.

Cool. One more reason to love the Prequels – they rehabbed what had become frustrating.

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8 thoughts on “Flashback Blog: How I Grew to Love Boba Fett thanks to the Prequels

  1. I’m not so sure Jango was as bad an ass as General Greivous, though. GG killed several Jedi. Jango killed one only because he was one of several simultaneous threats the Jedi was faced. (Sorry, but it’s amazing I know Kit Fisto’s name; don’t expect me to name this Jedi.)

    1. Oh, GG pwns Fett, but he’s got the advantage of a super fantastic robot body. (The Jedi Fett shoots is named Coleman Trebor — not proud of knowing that, but he was a member of the Council).

      And how could anyone forget Kit Fisto’s name?

  2. *sigh* KJ, You’ve finally irritated me enough to convert me from silent lurker to annoyed respondent. I can take most of your defense of the prequel series, but this goes too far.

    The prequels kill the mystery and legend of Boba, because now we have to assume that episodes 4-6, he’s the guy in the white armor. Don’t you think Luke and Han would have been surprised to learn that in Episode 4?

    Further, they butcher the legend of Boba by showing him as a sweet little boy with a crazy dad/clone, and raised on an alien pod on a water planet where it rains all the time, and his clones are growing up WAY faster then him and there’s no one to play with. Finally, he watches the murder of his dad/clone and there’s no one to take care of him. No beloved character has had a more messed up childhood since Harry Potter.

    The final insult of the Boba legend destroyed actually has to do with a movie-making faux pas. In the scene where Obi Wan is chasing Jango, they fly 1)into an asteroid field, and 2)Jango pulls a switch when he sits on a rock and waits for Obi Wan to go by, and then shoot at him. This scene is WAY to similar to the Episode 4 scene with the asteroid field (which, is supposed to be really crazy and deadly to do, and now it happens twice in a 6 movie series? grr), and the “going out with the garbage” scene (episode 5 I think?), which was really clever but now turns out to be some old flying trick everyone knows.

    Prequels renewing a love of Boba? Quite the opposite. More like destroyed it, and destroyed other movie elements along the way.

    1. You should know that, much like Mace Windu, eventually I find everyone’s weak spots. Click here for a good book to read for more about that skill. 🙂

      Boba’s not the guy in the white armor for the Original Trilogy actually — the voices are different. This is why the troopers eventually suck; when the original DNA donor is killed, they get degrading copies until they have to find new sources. They’re still clones, just not of Jango anymore.

      Boba, as a 10 year old, can fly a ship and nearly guns down Obi-Wan with its blaster cannons. Then cheers his dad on to blow him up. Not too sweet I’d say. As for the whole Father thing, tune in for my next blog, ‘Daddy Issues’, which deals with this point directly. But he’s hardly a sweet little boy.

      The chase in the rings of Geonosis was on purpose. I’m taking directly from Lucas — it demonstrates that 1. a Jedi needed a Droid to do it, but Fett (and Solo in Episode V) didn’t; 2. the trick Obi-Wan pulls is precisely why Boba *didn’t* get snookered when everyone else did in Episode V. He’d seen the trick before. This hearkens to Lucas’ intent to have it work as a tone poem as well.

      And I’d say in terms of a messed up childhood, Luke beats Boba hands down, and Luke is way more beloved than Boba. Potter’s a chump. 🙂

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